The cockroach of writing

Where “alternate” pretty unambiguously means “better,” but I couldn’t pass up the alliteration. Previously I’ve shown how human cone cells certainly do not peak at red, green and blue frequencies. But those colours are only associated with the peaks; what would it mean to depict the entire range of responses as a single colour? The […]

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Observation: red and green lights make yellow; green and blue lights make greenish-blue… Hypothesis: additive mixtures of lights average out the wavelengths to an intermediate colour. Prediction: red and blue together will produce green. Experimental: nope – it made purple. Now, audience participation time – choose your own Conclusion! colours add by a mechanism somewhat […]

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Internet assertion: Humans see colour with red, green, and blue cone cells, named for the colours they best detect. Human cone peak sensitivities: This is part of the reason why the labels L, M, and S (for “long”, “medium”, and “short”) are used exclusively in the literature: the traditional names for cone cells have almost […]

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Inktober is a yearly event where participants are encouraged to spend the month of October making an inked artwork every day. Or every week, or anything else really – it’s nothing official and there’s nothing to penalise, but the idea is to work on “positive drawing habits” and frequency is almost all of that. Last […]

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In any “discussion” concerning the “merits” of degrees Celsius versus degrees Fahrenheit, there’s an even chance someone will joke that we should all be using kelvins instead. Well I’m that guy, but without joking. Two principle reasons: it makes more sense, and nothing useful is lost. more sense There’s a lot of talk over how […]

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This video was too good to not share. It covers the entire history of Earth from 4.5 billion years ago to today, showing notable geological and biological events the whole way. There’s a fair abundance of available information on continental drift, atmospheric composition, evolution etc. changing over time, but it’s great to see it together […]

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The riffle shuffle is one of the best card shuffling methods. Mathematicians have done maths to determine that just half a dozen riffles usually provides acceptable randomness throughout the deck, if done properly. A lot of people don’t like it because it bends the cards. It’s worth pointing out that while the “showy” shuffles with […]

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For some reason the Ampere, a unit of electrical current, is a base unit of the SI, and electrical charge – an actual physical property of particles – is a derived unit. It’s quite comparable to defining velocity as a base unit and deriving length from that. Worth noting is that, from 2019 onwards, the […]

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In the realm of colourimetry, some form of chromaticity diagram is a convenient tool to see and understand what coordinates in a given colour space mean and how they relate to each other. Colour is inherently three-dimensional, but by transforming the space such that one of those dimensions represents luminance, it can be reduced to […]

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